Saturday, 1 November, 1828

Spent the day in my room, except a town visit. I have reflected intensely on a subject that is of vast importance to me. If I take the most favorable view of my situation, I can see no danger in adopting the course of a married life, because now my occupation will support us and yield a small income; and I have more than sufficient to purchase a dwelling now coming to me over and above demands against me. But here is the danger and here the difficulty, if not impossibility, of deciding: will this state of things continue? I may in one year find myself destitute of employment and without resources. As I have not dues sufficient, deducting several hundred dollars required for house and furniture to support me in that capacity, but for a very limited time; unless, therefore, there be a continual addition coming from some source, I should be placed in a situation ten times more deplorable than alone I possibly could be. So I am net yet determined. I hope if you are ever in the situation I now have slightly described, you will instantly abandon all such ideas, and wait until every circumstance will warrant the step contemplated. If my example may be attended with success which alone will decide, tit will afford but one evidence. Be it as it may, adopted or rejected.