Tuesday, 30 December, 1828

Now you must not give her anything that will make her sick. Don't you think we have waited too long? She is exactly like all my folks that died. Poor thing, she will go the same. Doctor, do you think you can help her? Why, Madam, with your permission I can try. I see nothing absolutely fatal in her case. Just what the other Doctor said and they all died. If you think there is no chance for her, don't give her a thing. She shan't be punished with medicine and have to die at last. Oh! I see she fails ev3ery hour. Do stay all night. It is not worthwhile for me to stay here and you forbid me administering for the relief of your daughter. Oh, don't talk of relief. She must die. I did not imagine she would be alive when you came, but I thought I just send for you to see what you thought of her. Well, good lady, if that was all you wanted of me, I can tell. I think your daughter can be cured and if she does die for want of medical aid, you may set down and contemplate that you have been instrumental in her death, and sit here and see her untimely end approved with all these ideas in your mind. Such conduct is inhuman and does not proceed from the bosom of a kind and benevolent Mother. So, if you refuse my aid I will not stay longer. I ask not to employ me. Send for whom you please, but help your daughter wants and must have. She now consented for me to prescribe by the strong solicitations of the patient. I left her really disgusted at such conduct and inhumanity. Are such the feelings of a fond Mother? I never was so vexed at the conversation of a parent. I began to conclude the old lady wished her child to die. I returned home in the night and could not expel the scenes of the day from the mind. Does that inhuman Mother desire to see the offspring expire? Can she delight even while she is yet alive to depict in her hearing the certainty of her death, adding mental pain to that of the body? I am sure she cannot have any feelings. She is a monster.