Friday, 2 January, 1829

I was surprised last evening to see the conduct of people, or the young people. They collected from the country in droves, both male and female, and then spent the night in running up and down the streets, collecting on the porches without distinction of respectability, the virtuous and abandoned, mingled indiscriminately in the same collection. And frequently some of the young men would come into my room and relate their conduct. It was indeed shocking for me to imagine such scenes of vice and impropriety should be allowed or sanctioned in this place. I said to myself as I listened to the recitals of these young men: Is it possible that these respectable young ladies with whom I am acquainted, indulge in these improprieties and scenes of abhorrent disgust. Do they condescend thus when all is in uproar and confusion, and the somber shades of night obscure the glare of day? For myself, I refused to join in such promenading or even to witness it, and confined myself to my room. I have been very much engaged in business for the past two days and have more satisfaction in that pursuit than in the pursuit of folly. Having also experienced the consequences of impropriety during the last year, i think it better to endeavor, to act accordingly.