Tuesday, 17 June, 1828

The morning is very agreeable and not oppressively warm. Occupied in reading and visiting a few home patients. Had considerable conversation with Mrs. Conrad, who has been an invalid for many years. She is full of talk and has been accustomed to complain and understands her own feelings completely. She is a fine woman, or at least this is now my judgment, but is from every symptom a very jealous one; not that I mean jealous of her husband, but of everything that relates to her family, and full of that kind of fear that others may be used or treated better than her or hers. She is remarkably fond of attention and elated with praise, and feels best when you sympathize with her in her suffering. She is at the same time passionate and easily sheds tears at her own suffering and opposition to her views. Such is the disposition of this lady. Yet she is quite amiable and agreeable, and I am fond of her company either for her sake or my own. I cannot yet fairly decide, as here is the center of attraction to me, and I find it increasing since yesterday. Now the proper course to follow under this state of things is not to frequent the place or person, and not permit desire to get master over the will. Mind not so much disturbed about former friends as before; consequently, more contented. This arises from two sources: more business and a probability of mroe friends.