Thursday, 16 July, 1829

When once the solemn vow is made, it is the duty and it is for the benefit of both, to impart as much happiness to each as every kind attention is calcualted to do. What would my feelings now be were I to imagine and have cause for that imagination, that she whom I have chosen for my bosom friend through life was untrue, inconstant, and unhappy with me, because some secret respect was bestowed on another. I had much rather see her shrouded and closed in the silent tomb and such must be the case on either. I will, therefore, endeavor to avoid everything, the tendency of which leads to such a dangerous precipice. We will, therefore, endeavor while we do live to use every precaution to avoid disturbing that happiness which pure and undissembled respect can produce and debar that friend, jealousy, from entering our peaceful abode. St that when the icy arms of death may encircle either, the surviving may not rejoice, but mourn. I am happy to state that my business yet continues to extend and that my anxiety of mind in consequence is great.