Sunday, 27 April, 1828

Milo Township, Yates County, New York

After many plans had been investigated by my own mind, in relation to the course to be adopted by me, and the various sections of the country having been recommended by different individuals of respectability, and from all the intelligence I could obtain thereto; the South seemed to have the greatest number of advantages. Accordingly, my mind was drawn toward the strongest point of attraction. This morning, agreeable to plans and calculations previously arranged, myself and Dr. Wm. W. Tyler left the above place in a light carriage with two horses and bent our course for the South, expected however not to stop short of South Carolina. We had as much medicine as we could well convey with the other necessary trunks of clothing and Books. We traveled up the Seneca Lake on whose borders we had long lived and whose beauties were familiar to us. Our individual feelings were different in many respects. He had just bid farewell to an affectionate wife and several small children with all the fondness of a kind Father. And, indeed, I must do him justice, for I do believe that he sacrificed his own happiness for the sole purpose of being a benefit to them, and endeavoring to better their condition, here he could see no prospect of success. His wife, also, to me seemed the pattern of goodness -the most kinds and affectionate. Yet she bore all her deprivations with the utmost fortitude; and believed the course he was adopting held out at least some prospect for the better, and said she was willing to do any way which should appear to be the best. His feelings under these circumstances I must leave for those who have felt the endearments of a family and are just leaving them in rather unfavorable pecuniary cirumstances. But when a man does all in his power, he does his duty.

My sensations probably were different. I had a few days before (15th inst.), bid a final adieu to my Aged Parents, Brothers, and Sisters. And not with feelings of indifference or disregard, because they were all dearly beloved by me. No man could have more affectionate parents or those who wished better for the respectability of their children, yet we could not always live together and I now consider it time for me to make preparation for the future life. I had no endeared object to mourn or to weep for me, yet there were many to whom I had become attached from an intimate acquaintance. But this could not support or yield any pecuniary profit, a consideration of vital importance in my situation; and for the purpose of honestly obtaining the one thing needful, and the prospect before me believed to be favorable, I could leave all with a degree of cheerfulness. We traveled on in silent mood for some time, broke at intervals by some object that happened to attract our attention. At night we found ourselves at the head of Seneca Lake, a distance of twenty-eight miles from our starting place - here we put up for the night. Our fare was of the real substantial articles of diet and not agreeable to me. After a few moments of conversation with the landlord, we retired to bed and being much fatigued in mind and body, all was forgot in the peaceful arms of Sleep.