Tuesday, 20 October, 1829

Who is it that should first teach the lisping infant to articulate aright? Most certainly the mother. Who should be well qualified to direct the first operations of infantile intellect? Most assuredly the mother. Who should understand the most proper and effectual way to correct in a mild way, and at a proper time, all the little thousand deviations and departures from correct actions? An intelligent mother. And for the best of reasons, all this is the proper, legitimate duty of the mother, because she is always present with them and her mind is less occupied with obtaining the necessaries of life and all the perplexities incident to the inevitable intercourse with the world forced on the man or father in ordinary life. I am disposed to think that much of the goodness and greatness of man in after life depends on the manner the infant mind has been conducted and disciplined and muchof this should be conducted by information and reflection; and this the mother should possess. To me it appears it is the most sacred duty incumbent on the mother to qualify herself that she may be capable to discharge these obligations in every particular, as a neglect of these duties must, in many instances, be  attended with melancholy effects. Such, indeed, I fear will yet present themselves to me in some considerable degree. It may be considered by some that it is unwise to anticipate troubles and difficulties that may never occur, but it is a duty we owe to ourselves to prepare for these that are probable to occur.