Tuesday, 29 June, 1830

I have today visited the slave of a rich and wealthy merchant and contrasted the comforts of those poor individuals seen yesterday and those of slaves and find that so far as the necessaries of attendance and suitable food are concerned, the latter is in the best situation. And I have observed that more anxiety is expressed by the owner of the recovery of the Negro than would be if all his poor neighbors were suffering.

I have today made an observation that is of some importance in a pecuniary view. I was requested to see the family of one of acquaintances, a very industrious man and one whose occupation was lucrative, and yet this individual was always involved and never purchased articles more befitting wealth than poverty. I made some inquiry during our conversation into the course he had pursued for past years and the secret to be concealed in the fact that this man was never permanently settled and that he was frequently building houses and improving, though a small portion, of land for others merely for the privilege of a place and shelter for his family. Thus he was giving his labor for nothing. Now this, if could be, more certainly should be avoided, because in a very short time enough is spent to purchase a small home, and improve it. You should be careful and not bestow gifts to those who have no need of them; but if your deeds of charity, let those receive who are objects of it.