Tuesday, 3 March, 1829

I have become acquainted with a Mr. B. Hauser, a planter in the neighborhood, of very singular manner, and yet not very singular, but he is one of those men whom you know not how to take from his manner of conversation. Yet he is a very good citizen and considreable property. Some people find a good deal of fault with him, but I believe those who find fault are themselves more to blame than Hauser. His singularity so far as I have seen is this: If you are doing business for him, he will say, Now, God be favorable in the charge; poor man, you know; Shan't be able to pay; do it well, and small charge; etc. Well, if you have an account against him, he will say, if there be a few cents, Oh! knock off the cents and make it just even, that but a trifle; come, you know Ben is poor. And here is the cash, etc., etc. But I believe so far as I have any knowledge of his dealings, he is quite honest. He is quite free and accommodating in his house.